Friday, February 1, 2013

Toddler Masterpiece Classic Presents: Who's Dat?


The triplets agreed their mother's reading of David Copperfield had been somewhat plebeian.

Afternoon Readers,

I'm not sure I've ever mentioned it, but I love to read out loud. As luck would have it, giving birth to three children has made it possible to legitimately practice this talent without looking insane while reading to random people on the street. 

Have you ever tried to someone either coming from or going to the grocery store?

Then you understand my pain.

The luxury of being able to pick a selection from a plethora of children's books and read with a zest for life never heard by anyone who values their hearing has been both exciting and a challenge. On the one hand, the twins love to be read to. On the other, making it through a story is proving more difficult than originally anticipated.

Today, a peek into a slice of story time.
A glimpse into disjointed story telling.
I give you...

Toddler Masterpiece Classic Presents:
"Who's Dat?"

"George was a good monkey and -"

"Who's dat?

"That's Curious George."

"Oh."

"..always very curious."

"Who's dat?"

"That's The Man in the Yellow Hat."

"Oh."

"But even -"

"Who's dat?"

"That's George."

"Oh."

"..good little monkeys -"

"Who's dat?"

"That's an apple."

This has been another episode of Toddler Masterpiece Classic. Join us next time to find out whether the the second paragraph is reached...

Until Next Time, Readers!






33 comments:

  1. Now I'll never know how it ends!!! Ugh. Damn kids.

    But I love children's books and could spend forever in that section at the bookstore. However, it starts to look kind of creepy if I hang out there too long, so I limit to once or twice a year...

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    1. Ha! I'll let you take my kids with you and then it won't look creepy. Sound good? Fantastic, they'll be there in a couple hours.

      Now then, I think you'll be happy to know that George got all the apples processed into cider. I just knew that would keep you up tonight.

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  2. Ha! This looks very familiar! I've got a Preschool Masterpiece Theater going on over here that looks very similar!

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    1. They really are the height of sophistication. I feel classier just getting the chance to try to read to them.

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  3. Ah yes, I know this well. After the eleventy-millionth "who's dat" I storm off shouting that if they aren't going to be quiet and listen then I'm not going to read it to them. Yep, I'm really mature.

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    1. I may or may not have stormed off once or ten times ...maybe.

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  4. That's familiar. Now that my twins are 8, however, we can get farther, though my son loves to provide color commentary. I'm reading The Lightning Thief aloud. After lightening destroys a car's roof, William pipes up, "Do you know that lightening is 10x hotter than the surface of the sun?" He provides such commentary every single paragraph. We'll be done the book when he's 12.

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    1. On the bright side, you'll be able to make that series last a lifetime without having to start anything else.

      It's good to know what I have waiting...

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  5. Replies
    1. Just the sound of the kids packing up and heading to your house for the weekend. They said they had a story they wanted you to read them. It's gonna be a lot of fun...:)

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  6. hahahahah! This was my kids, too. They were always pointing to the pictures asking, "Why's he mad?" or "Uh-oh, what happened" and always had to use my breezy, teachery voice: "We have to keep reading to find out!" Really started wanting to chuck the book across the room! Thank goodness it gets easier, it's not fair for them to spoil our sweet reading-to-my-kids moments!

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    1. I wish I had the breezy teacher voice. I have the highly strained voice from being in the insurance industry too long.

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  7. Brilliant. I always hated Curious George.

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    1. I don't hate him, but if I were the Man in the Yellow Hat, there's a good chance George would've been shipped back to the jungle after the first day.

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  8. Try reading in an accent. They're so confused by your sudden irish/spanish/british accent they forget to ask questions. It works. I swear.

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    1. Accents. Why haven't I thought of accents? Genius.

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  9. so awesome, this is why i just don;t read to my kids... they don't ask questions to the movies.

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    1. Smooth move, Ana. I should've told my kids I was illiterate, from the start ...and just explained the blog later.

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  10. Lol, been there and one this mostly with my second who has the attention span of a nat!! Great post :)

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    1. I'm hoping the attention span improves with time ..or maybe we'll stick with board books for the next eighteen years.

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  11. I think I would have got three lines in then said 'Look are you going to shut up and let me read'?

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    1. That sentence may have been paraphrased once or twice... possibly.

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  12. My first 'word' was 'tsat?' for 'what's that' which must have drove my mom batty. I'm really hoping my kids stick with something basic like 'ball' or 'cat'...mostly 'cat' as I really want one!

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    1. "What's dat?" is a close second to "Who's dat?" I'm trying to roll with it, and pray they know the difference by the time they move out.

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  13. Replies
    1. I hear they sell that in Barnes and Noble now..;)

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  14. What a cliffhanger, I can't wait to find out if you were ever able to turn the page.

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    1. You and me both, Jessica. You and me both.

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  15. When my son was 20 mos. old, his favorite was A Day with Barney. Problem was he would start crying when Barney went to bed. We could never read past Barney eating his dinner. My daughter was the "Who's dat?" child. Thanks for the smiles, Paige.

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  16. Laughed out loud. I may have the same audience here. So great, Paige.

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  17. I have the opposite of this - the kids letting me know what's gonna happen next. Uh hello? Who do you think read it to you the other 320 times!

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  18. Second paragraph? Ha! I'll have you know that I've "read" Spot's Bedtime Storybook before bed every night for a year, and I have absolutely no idea what it's about.

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  19. I understand ... I to have a love of reading with fluency and feeling... if the little ones would just hush and let me get my read on without interruption.
    Carrie @ Just Mildly Medicated

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